Angels In Fast Motion

Angels in Fast Motion tells the story of 4 people who are trying to cope with their drug problems.

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Country: USA

Language: English


Angels in Fast Motion, follows three people, each with their own story to tell, set in the grey city of Aalborg. Each of the protagonists is trying to come to terms and deal with their drugs problem whatever it may be and the storylines become nicely intertwined as the characters come to be involved with each other. Maria is a drugs trafficker who lives with her boyfriend who is a dealer training to be a tattooist and funding this training by selling drugs. However, Maria is lovelorn, since Asger is hardly the most demonstrative of men and something is going to give….

This is a very good, well made if somewhat depressing film that portrays the real life consequences of heavy drug use and as such is not something that is going to be a barrel of laughs from the outset. The second storyline is about a Stetso, a young man and career junkie who’s life is suddenly changed when his girlfriend walks off with someone else and he is left desperately trying to quit his drug habit in order to get her back. The third plot concerns Allan, who is returning to his home after a serious accident and who finds that he is haunted by his past as it starts to catch up with him.

Angels In Fast Motion

Angels In Fast Motion

Though the storyline is derivative of other genre pics, thus film does have a good script and some excellent acting on display. Thure Lindhardt as Stetso is particularly vivid, bringing his edgy twisted character to life in a way that never seems over the top, a delicate balancing act in a film like this and one which he pulls off with consummate skill. Claus Riis Østergaard comes off worse though by no means is his performance bad, it just lacks a certain energy and vibe that Lindhardt brings to his part and Signe Egholm Olsen is excellent as Maria, brilliantly portraying the conflict between pragmatism and emotion going on within her. A special mention must also go to Lars Mikkelsen as Stetso’s father who brings an intensity to match Lindhardt’s own, making their scenes sparkle with power.

Visually, the film is a treat with director Ole Christian Madsen clearly showing his inspirations but managing to craft something new and very much his own out of them. His grasp of storytelling is excellent and the visual style never swamps the excellent characterisations.

Recommended.

Awards: Zulu Awards
Nominations: Zulu Awards, Bodil Awards, Robert Festival

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