Alamar

Alamar is the brainchild of Pedro Gonzalez Rubio, who produced, directed, wrote shot and edited the entire piece, giving it a unity of style but showing that one man cannot do everything on a shoot from, time to time.

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Country: USA

Language: English

Alamar is the brainchild of Pedro Gonzalez Rubio, who produced, directed, wrote shot and edited the entire piece, giving it a unity of style but showing that one man cannot do everything on a shoot from, time to time. The film’s plot concerns a character called Natan from Italy who moves from his home to be with his father and grandfather in a fishing village near the coast in Mexico. Though it’s a huge culture shock for the young man, his forbears treat him with great kindness and respect, so much so that he starts to adapt quickly to his new life.

Alamar

Alamar

It’s a very organic movie, the action arising seamlessly and never once seeming contrived, with naturalistic characters who you actually do care about and the direction matches that feeling giving an almost impressionistic sense of the stunning sea based surroundings, rich and beautiful on camera but never dwarfing the human element. This movie is surprisingly immersive, evoking the places in which it is shot with a subtle skill that passes you by on first viewing but which reveals upon a closer look some extremely clever direction.

The narrative is deliberately ill defined, this is a tone movie, all about mood and feeling rather than the progression of one event to another with a general theme that is uplifting, reaffirming the importance of family to the individual, following the livers of three generations of boys, watching them become men and showing the clear lineage between them, especially in the paternalistic concern shown by the father for his inexperienced son. There is a great sense of joy and bonding in this movie, a sense of freedom and escape from the norms of society, something almost primitive about it in that it shows the human condition stripped down to the basics.

“Stripped down to the basics” also defines the style in which the film is shot, sometimes to it’s detriment though the beauty of the scenery tends to make up for any lack on the part of the camera operator and , as mentioned above there is a definite sense of “being there” evoked by the film that is often hard to put your finger on. It’s not an expensive movie by any means but what money there was has been used inventively in this absorbing little character piece that deserves a wider audience.

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