A Hole in my Heart

A hole in my heart is the story of a teenaged boy who is desperately trying to block out the sights and sounds of an increasingly depraved porn film being shot by his father and friends in the living room of their tiny apartment.

Release Date:

Stars:

Country: USA

Language: English

A film with a number of messages, powerfully, shockingly and unrelentingly presented by writer and director Lukas Modysoon, A hole in my heart is the story of a teenaged boy who is desperately trying to block out the sights and sounds of an increasingly depraved porn film being shot by his father and friends in the living room of their tiny apartment. It’s a truly angry film, Modysoon flinging a plethora of disturbing sexual images at us, screaming out his rage at the modern obsession with image and sex and the invasiveness of reality television programmes. The limits are pushed further than you might expect in these scenes, the director doesn’t spare the audience’s feelings for a second in his torrent of anger.

The film is therefore one man’s statement against the abasement of oneself or others in the hunger for temporary fame, of the abuse of women in pornography and the widespread media objectification of them. It takes swipes at gun culture, the massive wastage of resources by the western world, the use of cosmetic surgery to maintain a false and otherwise unattainable image, usually destructively, and it gives a disturbing and uncompromising central message that we are all part of the problem. Which indeed, we are.

A Hole in my Heart

A Hole in my Heart

Rickard the filmmaker in the story is portrayed as a pitiful character, suffering badly from his demons and projecting them onto Tess, the young and attractive woman starring in his depraved film. Tess is desperate for celebrity, exactly the sort of wannabe that is attracted to the lure of Reality TV but shows a tender childlike side and connects with the son, Eric. The porn actor, Geko, is disassociated from reality and seems to have difficulty in connecting with real people, though he too is shown to have a childlike side. It’s because of these humanising moments that the grotesquery of the film has such power,. We are invited to view them as real people with all the strengths and failing of the human condition. It is Eric though who brings the notes of grace and beauty to the film , counterpointing the activities in the living room and having the dignity to stand apart as the audience identification figure showing that such noble emotions can still flourish in the most depraved conditions.

Not an easy film to watch by any means but one that should have gained a wider audience. However it’s graphic sexual themes meant that it only ever had a limited release in it’s home territories so grab the chance to see it if you can. Just don’t expect a bundle of laughs.

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